Saturday, December 17, 2016

Research Blog 10: Final Abstract, Bibliography, and link


Abstract

The phenomenon of Transfer shock has been being researched since 1965.  Significant research has been done, but as more research is done more factors that contribute to transfer shock are discovered. Institutions across the nations have been attempting new programs to help reduce transfer shock, but the problem still continues. The term "Transfer Student capital" offers plausible explanations and solutions that can be implemented into our institutions to help minimize and reduce transfer shock among students.    Through research about factors of Transfer shock and Solutions to Transfer Shock through Transfer Student Capital these factors and idea bring great findings that minimizing Transfer shock needs to me strategic, individualized, as well as an institution wide involvement.

https://docs.google.com/a/scarletmail.rutgers.edu/document/d/1ZJ-mRRm6Nioix2K7N24Xa3m-nnQZLKK59AKEzwjp5DA/edit?usp=sharing

Bibliography

Brainard, Amy. "Rutgers University, School of Arts and Sciences." Transfer Student Success Guide. N.p., n.d. Web. 17 Dec. 2016.

Fain, Paul. "High Graduation Rates for Community College Transfers." High Graduation Rates for Community College Transfers. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Nov. 2016.

Grites, Thomas J. "Successful Transitions From Two‐Year to Four‐Year Institutions." New Directions for Higher Education 2013.162 (2013): 61-68.

Hills, John R. Transfer Shock--The Academic Performance Of The Junior College Transfer. n.p.: 1965. ERIC. Web. 26 Oct. 2016.

Jones, Kimberly-Interview Rutgers Univeristy.

Keeley, Edward J., III, and J. Daniel House. "Transfer Shock Revisited: A Longitudinal Study Of Transfer Academic Performance." (1993): ERIC. Web. 17 Dec. 2016.

Laanan, Frankie Santos, Soko S. Starobin, and Latrice E. Eggleston. "Adjustment of Community College Students at a Four-Year University: Role and Relevance of Transfer Student Capital for Student Retention." Journal of College Student Retention: Research, Theory and Practice 12.2 (2010): 175-209. Web.

Parmiter, Corey-Interview Rutgers University.

Thurmond, Karen. "Dealing with Transfer Shock." Transfer-Shock. N.p., n.d. Web. 17 Dec. 2016


Monday, November 28, 2016

Research Blog 8


My case for my paper is looking at Rutgers transfer statistics and how it compares to the research done and in my paper.  I have scheduled an appointment with one of the Deans for Transfer Students at Rutgers University to answer some questions.  I plan on asking them about the success rates of success rates of Rutgers Transfer students, the problems Rutgers students come into contact with when transferring, and solutions Rutgers uses to try to overcome or minimalize the so called "transfer shock" during the transfer process.  This goes hand and hand with what I am researching because it compares other peoples research, most of it that is not in this current year with what is happening at Rutgers.  I want to see if Rutgers is similar too the research I wrote about and if they use similar solutions or would be open to some of the solutions discussed by other researchers in my paper. 


Rutgers does have a Transfer website and on the Website I did find the "Transfer Success Guide".  This gives guidelines to Transfer Students and what they should do to be successful.  The link to the web page is below.

http://www.sasundergrad.rutgers.edu/current-students/transfer-students/transfer-student-success-guide

I want to see how relevant this information is to transfer students, and if these guidelines are actually helping students overcome transfer shock. 

The purpose of this case overall is to see if big universities like Rutgers University are using different solutions to ease the transfer process and minimize transfer shock.  What factors go into being a successful transfer student at Rutgers University.  And if these programs actually influence the success of transfer students.  Who are the most successful Rutgers Transfer students.

Saturday, November 26, 2016

Literature Review 5




Marlene Jannone

Literature Review #5






Citation:

Thurmond, Karen. "Transfer-Shock." Transfer-Shock. Web. 24 Nov. 2016.



In the article "Dealing with Transfer Shock" by Karen Thurmond, she try's to answer the question as to "why transfer shock is still relevant after 40 years" after number a number of studies done on the topic.  In the article Thurmond explains that even before Hills, researchers by the names of Martorana and Williams compared transfer students and native students and found that their is a problem with the adjustment of transfers to their institution which cause academic effectiveness the semester they transfer.  The article looks at the demographic research done from previous researcher and found that Durio, Helmick, and Slover found that African American transfer students earned higher grades than African American native students.  After much research their is not much that has changed from the original general conclusions about transfer shock.  One is recognized by Dawson and Dell is that transfer shock is universal and usually not significantly severe.  The conclusion that transfer shock guides and pre-transfer programs can minimize transfer shock and guide them into the right direction of transfer success.   Glass & Harrington suggested some interventions that may help reduce the effects of transfer shock.  They "believe that four year institutions should continue to seek effective ways of reaching out to these students, perhaps through counseling, tutoring, and mentoring in an effort to help them adjust more effectively to the academic and social life of the school"(2002).  Thurmond adds the concept of being an "unplanned transfer"  "Reasons for such a transfer include forced relocation by reason of employment for student or family member, academic failure at a first choice institution, failed relationships, or other circumstances, including some over which the student has little control" (Thurmond). For these students they require special attentions from academic advisors to make their transition easier and individualized upon their needs.  In conclusion the most important thing any transfer student needs is continuous academic advising in the first semester to guide them through the transition of transferring. 


Author:

Karen Thurmond is currently the Director of academic advising and Degree planning at the University Of Memphis, in Memphis Tennessee. Thurmond has written for the NACADA of advising transfer students and new academic advisors.  On top of Thurmond being the Director of academic advising she also manages a six year graduation project at the University of Memphis, that has increased graduation rates by 8%.  

Keywords: Transfer shock, academic advisors, unplanned transfer, solutions

Quotes:

"In a study that included both students who transferred from community colleges and other four year colleges, female transfer students earned higher grades than female native students, while male native students earned higher grades than male transfer students. African American transfer students earned slightly higher grades than African American native students" (Durio, Helmick, & Slover, 1982).

"Research has indicated that students who transfer from the community college to the four year school as juniors earn higher grades, have higher graduation rates, and have lower academic dismissal rates than students who transfer as freshmen or sophomore" (House, 1989).

"Glass & Harrington (2002) believe that four year institutions should continue to seek effective ways of reaching out to these students, perhaps through counseling, tutoring, and mentoring in an effort to help them adjust more effectively to the academic and social life of the school".

"Academic advising provides a forum for the transfer student to receive individual attention and guidance for the crucial first semester. Academic advisors should make early intervention in light of an awareness of the problems and solutions outlined in this paper. This strategy will provide transfer students with their best chance of minimizing transfer shock" (Thurmond).


Value:
This article will bring value to my paper because it brings a lot of the research I have done already together and looks at the perspective as to why after 40 year transfer shock is still relevant.  It adds more solutions to help reduce transfer shock as well as looks at other factors from research done by other researchers that adds to the overall academic effectiveness of transfers. 

Thursday, November 24, 2016

Research Blog #7: Frame




My academic frame for this project is all is based on the idea of transfer shock.  Transfer shock had been researched since 1965 and multiple factors have been discovered by researchers on why transfer shock happens, how this term transfer shock has developed since its original definition, the multiple aspects that play into students experience transfer shock, and solutions that can help reduce transfer shock at intuitions. I will be framing the idea by looking into the first definition, how it developed from different research, the different aspects that go into transfer shock (explaining the why?), and the solutions that can help reduce it on the perspective transfer student capital.  I will be using research from John R. Hills, Keeley and House, Thomas J. Grites, Frankie Santos Laanan, Karen Thurmond, and a look into the book "The Inheritors" by Pierre Bourdieu and Jean-Claude Passeron.   Frankie Santos Laanan research is particular essential to my frame of my project because he comes up with the idea of Transfer Student Capital and the way it goes hand and hand with the idea of transfer shock.   As well as the solution that are essential to reducing and fixing transfer shock to enhance transfer student capital.  My academic frame helps shape how my paper is going to be written in a organized manner.         

Monday, November 21, 2016

Literature Review #4

Marlene Jannone
Professor Michael Goeller
Research in Discipline
Literature Review #4
Frankie Laanan

Citation:
Laanan, Frankie Santos, Soko S. Starobin, and Latrice E. Eggleston. "Adjustment of Community College Students at a Four-Year University: Role and Relevance of Transfer Student Capital for Student Retention." Journal of College Student Retention: Research, Theory and Practice 12.2 (2010): 175-209. Web.
          
The article titled “Adjustment of Community College Students at a Four Year-University: Role and Relevance of Transfer Student Capital For Student Retentions” is about how community college is a major step in the pathway to a bachelor’s degree and about the complexity of the transfer experience from a two-year university to a four-year university.  This article examines the role and relevance of “transfer student capital” a step beyond the “transfer shock” concept.  The article begins by talking about barriers to a successful transfer, which include a lack of academic preparation, inaccurate transfer advising, unfamiliarity of academic expectations and the rigor of senior institutions, as well as weak transfer and articulation policies.  “The transfer function in community college can be view as mechanism that allows access and social mobility” (176).  Community colleges are a gateway and pathway to a Bachelor’s degree and provide the opportunity to those who would not so otherwise.  The transfer process is multi-dimensional and transfer students are complex. “Defined by Laanan, The Transfer Student Capital (TSC) refers to the experiences of community college students who transfer to 4 year institutions (Pappano, 2006). Specifically, TSC indicates how community college students accumulate knowledge to negotiate the transfer process” (177).  This includes an understanding of credit transfer agreements between colleges, grade requirements for admission into a desired major, and course prerequisites. Some solution to enhance student capital is touched upon in the article for you strategies for success.
Keywords: Student transfer capital, transfer shock, strategies
Author:
Frankie Santos Laanan has been awarded for his Achievement at his Research Award.  He currently works with Iowa State University and the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies.  His research focuses on the impact of community colleges on individuals and society.  He helped create the Office of Community College Research and Policy, which serves as the research entity of the Community College Leadership Program. His mentorship has guided 10 doctoral candidates to completion of their degree.   
Quotes:
“To enhance transfer student capital, universities can offer new transfer students important information during orientation sessions about the new strategies for successful transition.  Workshops offered by Universities can also incorporate information gathered from this study” (196).
“As additional contributor to enhance transfer student capital, various counseling services can provide assistance to transfer students” (196).
“In working with students individually, counselors will be better informed about transfer students’ issues and concerns and will be better prepared to assist students in their social, psychological, and academic process” (196).
“Student affairs professionals (residential life and campus organizations) can also benefit from these findings from this study.  Practical implications for this study can be implemented through innovative student services programming.  Student-run organizations can provide services and new and current transfer students to foster transfer student capital” (197).
Value:
I believe student capital offers solutions to transfer shock and if university take these solutions into account their can be solutions to transfer shock.  This research is significant to my paper because it introduced the whole new concept of transfer student capital and how it goes hand and hand with transfer shock.  It also explains the solutions to which it suggests to fix the problem of transfer shock.

Literature Review #3

Marlene Jannone
Professor Michael Goeller
Research in Discipline: College
Literature Review #3
Author: Paul Fain

Citation:
Fain, Paul. "High Graduation Rates for Community College Transfers." High Graduation Rates for Community College Transfers. N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Nov. 2016.
           High Graduation Rates for Community College Transfers by Paul Fain is about how the rate of community college students who transfer to 4 year institutions earn a bachelor degree is going up.  Graduation rates become even better when the student completes their associates degree before transferring to a 4-year institution.  Although graduation rates are high for community college students who transfer to institutions, “only one in five community college students transfer to a four year institution” (Fain).  The article looks at the “swirl” effect.  The swirl effect is when students transfer multiple times and move in and out of the academy.  It mentions how new statistics are important to keep track of beyond a state level of looking a transfer student, but on a national level.   The only problem with finding national statistic about transferring is that studies often focus on students at an individual institution, and lose track of them when they transfer.  Research shows that Four-Year Institutions have a way of drawing community college students in before they complete their associates degree.  The article brings into term a good point about how transfer students can succeed and receive a bachelor’s degree.  Jenkins give the suggestion that a way to make the so called “transfer pathway” smoother is to align the associates and bachelor degree programs.  This is something many colleges don’t do well.  The conclusion of the article recommends the best way for a transfer students success from a community college, is to encourage students to earn their associates degree before transferring.  Therefore, when these students arrive they are at junior standing and have college readiness.    
Author:
Paul Fain is a News Editor, who has been currently working for Inside Higher Ed since 2011.  Before working for Inside Higher Ed Paul fain spent 6 year working for The Chronicles of Higher Education where he was a reporter.  Paul has a large amount of experience in journalism writing for The New York Times, Washington City Paper, and Mother Jones.  He was fortunate enough to win a few awards for his journalism from the Education Writers Association and the Dick Schaap Excellence in Sports Journalism Award. Before becoming a highly successful writer Fain earned his degree at the University of Delaware, where he earned a degree in political science in 1996 and fell in love with journalism working for his school newspaper.   
Key Terms: Community College, Transfer Pathway, Swirl Effect
Quotes:
“The data also account for the “swirl” effect, which refers to the many students who transfer multiple times and move in and out of the academy, said Afet Dundar, associate director of research services at the center” (Fain)
“That’s because previous research has found that students who transfer from community colleges to four-year institutions generally are well-prepared for the coursework and for navigating college life” (Fain).
“Of course, with only 20 percent of community college students transferring to four-year institutions, relatively few students are getting the chance to prove themselves at the next level. Some of the students w.ho get screened out along the way might not have made it to the finish line for a bachelor’s degree. But others could” (Fain).
Value:
The Value of this article is to help me understand the success rates of community college transfer students and to see what can be done to help with success rates of community college students receiving their Bachelor’s degree.  The article brought to my attention many new terms which I look forward to using in my paper.


Tuesday, November 8, 2016

Research Blog 6: Visual



This image examines how students transfer and where they transfer.  The graph represents that 37.2% of college students transfer at least one within six years.The conclusion of this result was that community college was the top destination for transfer students from four-year institutions, 53.9 moving to a Junior college (community college).